Sunday, January 15, 2017

Garden Bloggers' Bloom Day & Foliage Follow-Up January 2017: Snowy Views!

January 2017 Garden
Welcome to the first Garden Bloggers' Bloom Day and Foliage Follow-Up for 2017! There is big news for the month of January, as I am very excited to be announcing the soon to be official launching of my second book! It is a continuation of the first and there will be a post forthcoming with the details, so stay tuned! In the meantime, it's Bloom Day and we've had a lot of snow in my Long Island garden.There will be some snowy views for January, so do come along and take a look.
Nandina domestica January
The month of January started off with normal temperatures for this time of year, in the 30's, with a light dusting of snow on the 6th. The forecast predicted another 2-4 inches for the next day, but winter storm Helena brought us 7.4 inches of snow to blanket the landscape. The garden turned into a winter wonderland!
Weeping Norway Spruce
To get these views I waded through the snow in winter boots to get to the gardens. There is nothing like the sight of the first white snow on branches of evergreens to show off winter structure and view the gardens from a different perspective. This glistening snow on this Weeping Norway Spruce is part of the pool garden.
Evergreens in the Winter Landscape
Along the driveway entry is Weeping White Pine (green foliage-closest), Weeping Blue Atlas Cedar (blue foliage-center) and Golden Oriental Spruce 'Skylands' (golden foliage-end). The red branches visible in the background are those of Coral Bark Maple 'Sango Kaku'. The red hues are much more pronounced after a winter's snow.
Northern Cardinal
A northern cardinal visits the bird feeder in our backyard every morning and I can view him from our patio room overlooking the garden.  Sparrows, Chickadees, Morning Doves, Blue Jays, Mocking Birds and Juncos also visit the feeder on a daily basis. I used my telephoto lens to get this close-up, so not to disturb him.
Weeping Blue Atlas Cedar and Coral Bark Maple
Here is a closer view of the Weeping Blue Atlas Cedar and Coral Bark Maple along the driveway. In the same garden is Golden Oriental Spruce 'Skyland's displaying its bright yellow-tipped branches.

Skyland's Oriental Spruce
The tree, which was planted back in 2008, is now twenty feet tall by three feet wide.
Nellie Stevens Winter Berries
I enjoy planting trees that will supply winter interest on the property and this Nellie Stevens Holly is one of them. Its bright red berries that form in autumn become even more prominent in winter.
Dried Hydrangea Flowers January
Here are some of the remaining flowers from Hydrangea Tardivia, which I leave on the tree for winter interest. It blooms on new wood, so any dried blooms that don't blow away over the winter can be pruned in early spring.
January Poolscape
In the backyard, here is the covered mountain lake pool completely under a layer of snow. The pool area is surrounded by evergreen and deciduous trees and shrubs.
Gold Mop Cypress Winter Color
Here is another of the many evergreens around the property. Gold Mop Cypress adds some color to the garden, especially in winter. As you can see here, many of the shrubs are snow covered with only the bottom foliage exposed, which creates an inviting haven for birds. I watch them tuck themselves under the branches to keep warm, and almost got a photo, but the little Chickadee hiding there went deeper into the shrub. I backed off not to scare him away.
Lamp post Garden January
More snow covered scenes around the property include this lamp post at the end of the driveway, where a Weeping Norway Spruce is the focal point...  
Weeping Japanese Maple Winter
and a snow covered Weeping Japanese Maple.
Feeder in Winter
As we head back towards the warmth inside, the cardinal is still enjoying the feeder, and the morning sun highlights the garden.
Golden Sweet Flag Winter
I couldn't resist capturing this as a photo. Even Bear cannot "bear" to look at the snow covered landscape before him, and dreams of warmer days ahead! He's counting, and there's 63 days to go until the official arrival of spring!
Garden Bear Winter: Hiding from the Snow!
The temperatures warmed up dramatically right before Bloom Day with some rain that melted all the snow, but I was able to get those snowy views to share with you! The forecast for the rest of the month calls for warmer days, going up into the 50's, then back into the 30's and 40's to finish out January. 
Hellebore 'Shooting Star'
Here is some anticipation of what is yet to come. I am sure there will be more snow covered days before the warmer temperatures arrive, and I do enjoy the beauty of a landscape covered in glistening white.
January 2017 Garden
I hope you enjoyed your stroll through my January garden. Special thanks go out to our hostesses Carol at May Dreams Gardens, who makes it possible to see blooms on the 15th of every month with her meme Garden Bloggers' Bloom Day and Pam at Digging for hosting Foliage Follow-Up.  I am also linking with some other wonderful hosts and hostesses at Today's FlowersFloral FridaysMacro Monday 2, and Nature Notes at Rambling Woods. Also check out In a Vase on Monday at Rambling in the Garden, Garden Bloggers' Foliage Day and Saturday's Critters.


As Always...Happy Gardening!


Author: Lee@A Guide to Northeastern Gardening, © Copyright 2017. All rights reserved

30 comments:

  1. Your garden looks gorgeous with that blanket of snow and the sunshine....ahhhh such wonders. Happy GBBD.

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    1. We just got another couple of inches and everything is all white again. It's pretty when there is no shoveling needed, but just a pretty landscape!

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  2. It sometimes amazes me to see the difference between upstate New York near Binghamton, and Long Island. We have no snow on the ground so it was nice (for a change) to have to look at someone else's pictures - and no shoveling needed. We've had January thaws before, but the last two winters have been so unusual. Alana ramblinwitham.blogspot.com

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    1. I am glad you can experience the snow virtually without the shoveling Alana! Our last two winters have been very unusual as well. The temperatures can go from 20's and snow, up to record highs in the 50's, then back to snow again...very unpredictable.

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  3. Congratulations on your second book! The snow is beautiful. It really shows off the great structure of your evergreens, as well as deciduous plants like the coral bark maple. Skyland's Oriental Spruce is amazing. Once in a rare while we get a snow like that, and it is always a wonder to see. I like your boots; they look warm and comfy!

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    1. Thank you Deb! The book is on amazon, but they have not set up the previews or anything yet, since it is so new...takes a while. I am glad you enjoyed the snow photos. The boots are warm and cozy, and perfect for tramping through the snow drifts!

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  4. Well, it appears that all we share in our current garden line-ups is the berries of Nandina domestica but, given the extreme differences in our climates, I guess that's not surprising! Even under a blanket of snow, your garden looks lovely, Lee. I hope you thaw out soon!

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    1. Thank you Kris! I enjoyed seeing your California blooms at this time of year. I did see some Nandina domestica while visiting California, and was amazed as to how much bigger and fuller the plant gets there. I guess it's all that California sunshine!

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  5. Tis the season of evergreens and conifers! My blanket of snow is too deep to get a peek at mine. This week we should have rain to wash it away. I'm ready. I'm very impressed with the Skyland's Oriental Spruce. The color and structure are beautiful.

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    1. Those are my feelings exactly. We definitely need those beloved evergreens in our snowy winters. It looks like you got about the same amount of snow as we did. Keep warm!

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  6. Your garden does not lack for color, even in January.

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    1. Thank you Dorothy! I enjoyed your post, especially the Carolina jessamine and your bottle tree!

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  7. Wonderful pictures of your snowy garden, Lee. Love your last collage: nice boots, keep warm!

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    1. Happy New Year Nadezda. I enjoyed your snow covered garden as well. The boots do come in handy at this time of year and always represent the first major snowfall!

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  8. Your garden looks beautiful in its blanket of snow! We have had very little snow so far this winter, and I do miss its beauty, not to mention the insulation for the plants. Congratulations on your new book!

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    1. Thank you for visiting and for your kind words Rose. Your gardening diary for 2016 was beautiful!

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  9. Congratulations on your new book! Your garden looks fabulous blanketed with snow. I've never seen a cardinal in person and am always thrilled to see images of them.

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    1. Thank you Peter! I am so glad the Cardinals overwinter here. They are such a joy to watch so I keep the feeder full to keep them around. They just started staying around over the past ten years or so.

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  10. You make some of the most beautiful mosaics! And I showed my hubby the photo of the winter black bear! Poor thing...he can't see! He's snowblinded! LOVE the lamppost and fence. Beautiful snow scenes! Hugs from Florida, Diane

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    1. Thank you Diane! I couldn't resist taking that picture and I figured my readers would get a chuckle from it. Thanks for visiting and I am glad you enjoyed the photos!

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  11. There is just something so lovely about the views of a well planned garden covered in snow. The few snows we had this year quickly melted away, and now it's just crazy warm for January. This weather will continue all week, so I hope my plants don't do anything foolish!

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    1. I appreciate your kind words Robin. Plants do have a way of adapting. I've had bulbs in the past coming up in February and they did just fine once spring arrived. The last few years have been crazy as far as unpredictable seasons. They all seem to be off by a few weeks.

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  12. Lee, the snow on the conifers is a perfect winter scene. Bear doesn't look too happy about it though. Congrats, by the way, on your forthcoming new book! Pam/Digging: penick.net

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    1. I am glad you enjoyed the snowy photos Pam. It looks a little different from where you are at this time of year. Thank you for hosting Foliage Follow-Up and for the congrats on the new book. The setting up part is getting there!

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  13. I love the looks of a colorful garden like yours after a light fluffy snowfall. And the nice blue sky really adds a great background. You had a perfect day for photos.
    Congratulations on your second book! That's a wonderful accomplishment!

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    1. Thank you Susan! I am still trying to get everything set up for the book so I can officially launch it. I am glad you enjoyed this month's stroll!

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  14. Hello, I love the snow covered pines. The cardinal is beautiful. The winter garden bear is cute. Thank you for linking up and sharing your post. Happy Sunday, enjoy your new week ahead!

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    1. Thank you for hosting and visiting Eileen. Have a great week!

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  15. Evergreens always look amazing in winter scenery.

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    1. I am glad you enjoyed the photographs Klara. There is something to be said about evergreens covered with snow...one of my favorite things about winter. Thanks for visiting!

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Thank you for visiting. I love reading your comments and knowing you have been here, and will try to reciprocate on your blog. If you have any questions I will try my very best to answer them. As always...HAPPY GARDENING!

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